We hear more and more about hackers and cyber attackers accessing other people's personal data through security flaws in computers, phones, tablets and internet accounts. Phishing? Spyware? What is this?
Phishing
Pharming
Spyware
SIM card swap
This is when a hacker pretends to be an institution or company and, through emails, social networks, calls or SMSs, tries to get you to divulge personal information. It happens when you receive dubious emails with links that send you to false pages, for example, pages resembling the bank's website, and asking you to fill out a set of data.
This is when a virus on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone) redirects a link input by you to a false internet page (called a 'mirror website'). Sometimes this page looks like the bank's website, allowing third parties to obtain all the personal information that you type in. This virus can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file.
This is when malicious software installs itself on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone), without you noticing, and spies on your equipment and on your data. This software can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file. Once installed, it detects whether you are accessing protected sites, like homebanking pages, and records the data inserted, which then may be used unduly by other people.
This is when, for example, someone collects information about you, directly or through social media, and manages to pose as you in a phone store, to request the reissue of a SIM card. This allows all calls and SMSs received, including one-time passwords ('disposable' passwords, valid only for one homebanking access or transaction, which are sent by SMS), to be directed to the SIM in the possession of that other person.
What can you do to protect yourself?
  • Protect your computer, tablet or phone. +
     Set passwords and create lock screen sequences so that your equipment can't be used by third parties; Do not give permission for sites or apps with confidential information to start sessions automatically, without requiring a log-in; Keep your operating system and anti-virus and anti-spyware software updated on all your equipment. Keep the firewall active; Avoid public equipment (shared computers for example), mainly when you want to conduct bank transactions or payments.
  • Protect your internet connections. +
     Don't connect to public or unknown wi-fi networks; Don't open suspect emails. Does the email have mistakes? Is it in another language? Is it abnormal that they contact you with that kind of email? Don't trust it and report it directly to the person or through the official channels of any entity allegedly trying to contact you (for example the bank, the online store, the delivery services company...); Don't click on unknown links or download from unknown sources; Don't open email attachments from senders you do not recognise; Always type the URL you want instead of using a link or accessing the web history; Check that the address you wish to access starts with https:// and that there is a padlock in the navigation bar or at the bottom of the window. This means that the link is secure; You can test if the site is safe by using the 'wrong password trick'. Instead of your usual login, put the wrong password in. If it is accepted, this means that the entity in question is not checking your login (in other words, it may simply be collecting the password you put in for illicit use); Only install trustworthy apps from official app stores. Not all apps are secure and may contain malicious software.
  • Protect your data. +
     Do not give out your passwords to third parties; Don't write passwords or other confidential information on paper, or keep it in emails or on your phone; Choose passwords that are hard to guess and use different passwords for different accounts; Do not put your data (name, phone number, email address, ID card no., bank account numbers) into sites that you do not know or whose authenticity you cannot trust. In case of doubt, close the window and talk to your parents and the entities you usually contact (for example the bank or online store).
 We hear more and more about hackers and cyber attackers accessing other people's personal data through security flaws in computers, phones, tablets and internet accounts. Phishing? Spyware? What is this?
Phishing
Pharming
Spyware
SIM card swap
This is when a hacker pretends to be an institution or company and, through emails, social networks, calls or SMSs, tries to get you to divulge personal information. It happens when you receive dubious emails with links that send you to false pages, for example, pages resembling the bank's website, and asking you to fill out a set of data.
This is when a virus on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone) redirects a link input by you to a false internet page (called a 'mirror website'). Sometimes this page looks like the bank's website, allowing third parties to obtain all the personal information that you type in. This virus can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file.
This is when malicious software installs itself on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone), without you noticing, and spies on your equipment and on your data. This software can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file. Once installed, it detects whether you are accessing protected sites, like homebanking pages, and records the data inserted, which then may be used unduly by other people.
This is when, for example, someone collects information about you, directly or through social media, and manages to pose as you in a phone store, to request the reissue of a SIM card. This allows all calls and SMSs received, including one-time passwords ('disposable' passwords, valid only for one homebanking access or transaction, which are sent by SMS), to be directed to the SIM in the possession of that other person.
What can you do to protect yourself?
  • Protect your computer, tablet or phone. +
     Set passwords and create lock screen sequences so that your equipment can't be used by third parties; Do not give permission for sites or apps with confidential information to start sessions automatically, without requiring a log-in; Keep your operating system and anti-virus and anti-spyware software updated on all your equipment. Keep the firewall active; Avoid public equipment (shared computers for example), mainly when you want to conduct bank transactions or payments.
  • Protect your internet connections. +
     Don't connect to public or unknown wi-fi networks; Don't open suspect emails. Does the email have mistakes? Is it in another language? Is it abnormal that they contact you with that kind of email? Don't trust it and report it directly to the person or through the official channels of any entity allegedly trying to contact you (for example the bank, the online store, the delivery services company...); Don't click on unknown links or download from unknown sources; Don't open email attachments from senders you do not recognise; Always type the URL you want instead of using a link or accessing the web history; Check that the address you wish to access starts with https:// and that there is a padlock in the navigation bar or at the bottom of the window. This means that the link is secure; You can test if the site is safe by using the 'wrong password trick'. Instead of your usual login, put the wrong password in. If it is accepted, this means that the entity in question is not checking your login (in other words, it may simply be collecting the password you put in for illicit use); Only install trustworthy apps from official app stores. Not all apps are secure and may contain malicious software.
  • Protect your data. +
     Do not give out your passwords to third parties; Don't write passwords or other confidential information on paper, or keep it in emails or on your phone; Choose passwords that are hard to guess and use different passwords for different accounts; Do not put your data (name, phone number, email address, ID card no., bank account numbers) into sites that you do not know or whose authenticity you cannot trust. In case of doubt, close the window and talk to your parents and the entities you usually contact (for example the bank or online store).
 We hear more and more about hackers and cyber attackers accessing other people's personal data through security flaws in computers, phones, tablets and internet accounts. Phishing? Spyware? What is this?
This is when a hacker pretends to be an institution or company and, through emails, social networks, calls or SMSs, tries to get you to divulge personal information. It happens when you receive dubious emails with links that send you to false pages, for example, pages resembling the bank's website, and asking you to fill out a set of data.
This is when a virus on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone) redirects a link input by you to a false internet page (called a 'mirror website'). Sometimes this page looks like the bank's website, allowing third parties to obtain all the personal information that you type in. This virus can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file.
This is when malicious software installs itself on your computer, tablet or phone (smartphone), without you noticing, and spies on your equipment and on your data. This software can be installed when you download an apparently inoffensive file. Once installed, it detects whether you are accessing protected sites, like homebanking pages, and records the data inserted, which then may be used unduly by other people.
This is when, for example, someone collects information about you, directly or through social media, and manages to pose as you in a phone store, to request the reissue of a SIM card. This allows all calls and SMSs received, including one-time passwords ('disposable' passwords, valid only for one homebanking access or transaction, which are sent by SMS), to be directed to the SIM in the possession of that other person. What can you do to protect yourself?
  • Protect your computer, + 
tablet or phone.
     Set passwords and create lock screen sequences so that your equipment can't be used by third parties; Do not give permission for sites or apps with confidential information to start sessions automatically, without requiring a log-in; Keep your operating system and anti-virus and anti-spyware software updated on all your equipment. Keep the firewall active; Avoid public equipment (shared computers for example), mainly when you want to conduct bank transactions or payments.
  • Protect your internet + connections.
     Don't connect to public or unknown wi-fi networks; Don't open suspect emails. Does the email have mistakes? Is it in another language? Is it abnormal that they contact you with that kind of email? Don't trust it and report it directly to the person or through the official channels of any entity allegedly trying to contact you (for example the bank, the online store, the delivery services company...); Don't click on unknown links or download from unknown sources; Don't open email attachments from senders you do not recognise; Always type the URL you want instead of using a link or accessing the web history; Check that the address you wish to access starts with https:// and that there is a padlock in the navigation bar or at the bottom of the window. This means that the link is secure; You can test if the site is safe by using the 'wrong password trick'. Instead of your usual login, put the wrong password in. If it is accepted, this means that the entity in question is not checking your login (in other words, it may simply be collecting the password you put in for illicit use); Only install trustworthy apps from official app stores. Not all apps are secure and may contain malicious software.
  • Protect your data. +
     Do not give out your passwords to third parties; Don't write passwords or other confidential information on paper, or keep it in emails or on your phone; Choose passwords that are hard to guess and use different passwords for different accounts; Do not put your data (name, phone number, email address, ID card no., bank account numbers) into sites that you do not know or whose authenticity you cannot trust. In case of doubt, close the window and talk to your parents and the entities you usually contact (for example the bank or online store).